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Start Allgemein Citizenship Day, Constitution Day -- Bedeutung

Citizenship Day, Constitution Day — Bedeutung

Der 17. September ist Citizenship Day und Constitution Day und Constitution Week beginnt

In Erinnerung an die Unterzeichnung der Verfassung sowie in Anerkennung der amerikanischen Bürger, die sich darum bemühen die Pflichten und Verantwortungen, die mit Staatsbürgerschaft verbunden sind, aufrecht zu erhalten, wurde vom U.S. Kongress am 29. Februar 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106), der 17. September als offizieller „Citizenship Day“ erklärt.
Am 2. August 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108) folgte Erweiterung insofern, dass der Präsident jedes Jahr die dem 17. September folgende Woche als „Constitution Week“ proklamieren solle.

Offizielle Definition durch den United States Code im folgenden:
Sec. 106. Citizenship Day

  • (a) Designation. – September 17 is Citizenship Day.
  • (b) Purpose. – Citizenship Day commemorates the formation and signing on September 17, 1787, of the Constitution and recognizes all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.
  • (c) Proclamation. – The President may issue each year a proclamation calling on United States Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on Citizenship Day and inviting the people of the United States to observe Citizenship Day, in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies.
  • (d) State and Local Observances. – The civil and educational authorities of States, counties, cities, and towns are urged to make plans for the proper observance of Citizenship Day and for the complete instruction of citizens in their responsibilities and opportunities as citizens of the United States and of the State and locality in which they reside.

Wie sieht eine solche Proklamation denn nun aus? Nachfolgend einige Proklamationen als Beispiel.

Die 2019 Proklamation

Presidential Proclamation on Constitution Day, Citizenship Day, and Constitution Week, 2019

Two hundred thirty-two years ago, the Framers of the Constitution met in Philadelphia and set our country on a bold course toward forming a more perfect Union.  John Adams called the drafting of the Constitution “the greatest single effort of national deliberation that the world has ever seen,” and since its ratification, this exceptional document has remained the bedrock of the rule of law for our Nation.  On this day and during this week, we celebrate the signing of the Constitution and the American citizens who have devoted their lives to implementing the Framers’ vision for the world’s grandest and most successful experiment in self-government. The Founders understood that a self-governing republic requires a free and empowered citizenry.  We are therefore grateful that our Constitution is designed, first and foremost, to secure liberty.  Through a system of limited Government and checks and balances, the Constitution limits the ability of the State to become an obstacle to human flourishing, while simultaneously enabling the State to serve order, protect rights, and provide public goods. Since taking office, I have nominated two Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States who have exhibited a proven commitment to the Constitution.  I have also nominated and the Senate has confirmed 150 other Federal lower court judges who will faithfully interpret the Constitution and the laws of our Nation.  With appropriate respect for the genius of the Framers and in accordance with the rule of law, our Nation’s Federal judges should always strive to interpret our laws, including our Constitution as written, regardless of any political or policy preferences they may hold in their capacity as citizens.

The drafters of our Constitution were committed not to a king or Government but to a belief in the promise of America as a free and prosperous society.  To fulfill that promise, they designed a Government and a Constitution that could withstand the inevitable demagoguery, passions, and exigencies that would seek to unmake us as a people.  And though the durability of our Constitution has been tested through crises and wars, it has endured.  Today and throughout this week, we recognize the magnitude of the Constitution and the unparalleled success of the system of Government it helped create.

The Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106), designated September 17 as “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day,” and by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108), requested that the President proclaim the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as “Constitution Week.”

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2019, as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, and September 17, 2019, through September 23, 2019, as Constitution Week.  On this day and during this week, we celebrate the citizens and the Constitution that have made America the greatest Nation this world has ever known.  In doing so, we recommit ourselves to the enduring principles of the Constitution and thereby “secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this
sixteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth.

DONALD J. TRUMP

Die 2015 Proklamation

Presidential Proclamation — Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, Constitution Week, 2015

CONSTITUTION DAY AND CITIZENSHIP DAY, CONSTITUTION WEEK, 2015

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

At the culmination of months of deliberation, debate, and compromise, on September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States of America was signed.  Colonists came together in bold pursuit of a roadmap for citizenship and a framework for our democracy — exemplifying the statesmanship and character that would forever set our Nation apart.  Yielding to the power of shared ideals over stubborn opinion, our forefathers upheld a belief that remains at the heart of America today:  that men and women of free will have the capacity to shape their own destinies.

These early patriots understood what it meant to be American.  They succeeded in crafting a document that enshrines our enduring faith in the notion that being a citizen is about more than circumstances of birth — we are bound together by our beliefs, our unalienable rights, and the idea that we must accept certain obligations to one another and to future generations.  In what has become the supreme law of our land, and in the ensuing amendments to it, we see a reflection of our Founding Fathers‘ insistence that the task of perfecting our Union is never finished — we must constantly take up the critical work of bettering ourselves and our society.  These ideals have driven America forward from her nascence on the cobblestone streets of Philadelphia through today, and we continue to shine as a beacon of hope and freedom to the rest of the world.

Each year on Citizenship Day, we welcome our country’s newest citizens and reaffirm our proud legacy as a Nation of immigrants.  In wave after wave through the centuries, people from every corner of the globe have come to our shores in pursuit of happiness and a better life for themselves and their families.  In their home countries, our Constitution has stood out as an emblem of equality and representation for all.  Those of us who have been Americans our entire lives have an obligation to remember that we were strangers once, too, and together we must work to extend the promise that citizenship provides to all who seek liberty’s light.  Since last year, we have redoubled these efforts by creating the White House Task Force on New Americans — a Government-wide effort tasked with better integrating immigrants and refugees into American communities.  The Task Force released its strategic plan in April, which includes efforts to raise awareness about the rights, responsibilities, and importance of United States citizenship.  It is essential that we encourage individuals who are eligible to take an important step in their American journey and commit to becoming a citizen.

On this day and throughout this week, let us honor the values for which the Framers stood by rededicating ourselves to carrying forward the spirit first embodied in their achievements — that what makes our country great is not that we are perfect, but that we can face our imperfections and decide that it is in our power to remake our Nation to more closely align with our highest ideals.  With time, courage, and the participation of our citizenry, we can pay tribute to those who shaped the land we love today while working to secure everlasting peace, prosperity, and opportunity for all who call America home.

In remembrance of the signing of the Constitution and in recognition of the Americans who strive to uphold the duties and responsibilities of citizenship, the Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106), designated September 17 as „Constitution Day and Citizenship Day,“ and by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108), requested that the President proclaim the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as „Constitution Week.“

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2015, as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, and September 17 through September 23, 2015, as Constitution Week.  I encourage Federal, State, and local officials, as well as leaders of civic, social, and educational organizations, to conduct ceremonies and programs that bring together community members to reflect on the importance of active citizenship, recognize the enduring strength of our Constitution, and reaffirm our commitment to the rights and obligations of citizenship in this great Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

BARACK OBAMA

Die 2004 Proklamation:

September 17, 2004
Two hundred and seventeen years ago this week, delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed one of the most enduring documents in history: the Constitution of the United States. Our Constitution is the foundation of our liberty and has guaranteed the rights of our people through a history of tremendous change and progress.
Today, we marvel at the wisdom of the Framers who toiled through a long summer of learned and contentious debates. Their work produced a document that upholds high ideals, while answering the most practical questions of governance. The charter they crafted — with its separate branches of Government, enumerated powers, checks and balances, and later the specific protections provided by our Bill of Rights — guides our Nation and inspires others around the world.
During Constitution Week, our Nation reflects on the significance of our Constitution and gives thanks for the blessings of liberty that this document helps to secure. We honor the men and women who have supported and defended it throughout our history, at times with their lives. On Citizenship Day, we reaffirm our commitment to freedom, to ensuring that our history endures, and to instilling in America’s next generation the values that make our country great.
In remembrance of the signing of the Constitution and in recognition of the Americans who strive to uphold the duties and responsibilities of citizenship, the Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106, as amended), designated September 17 as „Citizenship Day,“ and by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108, as amended), requested that the President proclaim the week beginning September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as „Constitution Week.“
NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2004, as Citizenship Day, and September 17 through September 23, 2004, as Constitution Week. I encourage Federal, State, and local officials, as well as leaders of civic, social, and educational organizations, to conduct ceremonies and programs that celebrate our Constitution and reaffirm our rights and obligations as citizens of our great Nation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth.
GEORGE W. BUSH

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